24 września 2011

Michael Pettis - Ameryka musi zrezygnować z dolara jako waluty rezerwowej świata

Ten wpis dotyczy zdarzeń makroekonomicznych i globalnych. Jest on dla mnie znaczący. Jest parę osób, których komentarzy czy opinii staram się nie przegapić. Taką osoba jest M. Pettis, który pisze rewelacyjnie o Chinach, bilansie płatniczym, deficytach czy euro. To on starał się obalić: Jakiś czas temu wypowiadał się o dolarze i wskazywał, wbrew obiegowej opinii, iż USA bardzo dużo traci jako kraj, którego waluta jest wykorzystywana do przechowywania rezerw walutowych. Wiem, to dosyć kontrowersyjna teza, ale tak to bywa w przypadku łamania mitów. Osobiście zgadzam się z Michałem, który m.in. twierdzi, iż US pozwalając na deindustrializację ("odprzemysłownienie" gospodarki) i deficyt na rachunku bieżącym miała prosty wybór - albo pozwolić na strukturalne wysokie bezrobocie w kraju, albo zacząć zaciągać długi, wraz z jego obywatelami. Oprócz tekstu poniżej polecam i ten tekst w FT - America must give up on the dollar. Samego tekst poniżej z Foreign Policy niestety nie mam czasu przetłumaczyć dlatego zachęcam do jego przetłumaczenia w całości lub we fragmentach na język polski. An Exorbitant Burden (Nadmierny ciężar) Why keeping the dollar as the world's reserve currency is a massive drag on the struggling U.S. economy.
France, Germany, China, and Russia are actively promoting the replacement of the U.S. dollar with an International Monetary Fund basket of currencies -- known as the Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) -- as the global reserve currency. The United States is resisting. Both sides have their arguments backward. The SDR should indeed replace the dollar as the dominant reserve currency if we want to eliminate the tremendous global trade and capital imbalances that have characterized the world for much of the past 100 years. This will not happen, however, until the United States forces the issue -- which it seems unwilling to do, perhaps for fear that it would signal a relative decline in the power of the U.S. economy. But the United States should, in fact, support doing away with the dollar. For all the excited talk of politicians, journalists, and generals, a world without the dollar would mean faster growth and less debt for the United States, though at the expense of slower growth for parts of the rest of the world, especially Asia. A French economist once told me that too often when policymakers think they are talking about economics they are actually talking about politics. A case in point, perhaps, is the claim first made in 1965 by Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, then France's finance minister, that the dollar's dominance as the global reserve currency gave the United States an "exorbitant privilege." Giscard may have thought he was discussing economic privilege, but while during the Cold War there may well have been political advantages to the use of the dollar as the dominant reserve currency, economically it held little benefits to the United States. If anything, it forced upon the United States an exorbitant cost. According to most political commentators, there are two main privileges accruing to the United States as a function of the dollar's reserve status. First, it allows the United States to consume and borrow beyond its means as foreigners acquire U.S. dollars. Second, because foreign governments must buy U.S. government bonds to hold as reserves, this additional source of demand for Treasury bonds lowers U.S. interest rates. Both claims are muddled. Take the first. It may be correct to say that the role of the dollar allows Americans to consume beyond their means, but it is just as correct, and probably more so, to say that foreign accumulations of dollars force Americans to consume beyond their means. Can foreign governments really do this? It is easy to dismiss the argument with a snappish "No one puts a gun to the American consumer's head and forces him to consume!" This is, indeed, the standard rejoinder. But this absurd argument only indicates how confused most people, even economists, are about balance-of -payments constraints. The external account is not simply a residual of domestic activity, even for a large economy like that of the United States. It is determined partly by domestic policies and conditions, but also by foreign policies and conditions, which in the latter case directly affects the relationship between domestic American consumption and savings. How so? When foreigner central banks intervene in their currencies -- and otherwise repress their domestic financial systems -- they automatically increase their savings rate by forcing down household consumption. As their savings rise, the excess must be exported, often in the form of central bank purchases of U.S. government bonds. If there is no change in the total amount of global investment, and since savings must always equal investment, by exporting their savings to the rest of the world, the savings rate of the rest of the world (i.e. their trading partners) must decline, whether or not they like it. The only way their trading partners can prevent this is by themselves intervening. This is why when commentators insist that only an internally generated increase in the U.S. savings rate can reduce the trade deficit (and thus it is useless to look abroad for solutions), it is because they do not understand the global balance-of-payments mechanism. But U.S. savings -- like that of any open economy -- must automatically respond to changes in the global balance of savings and investment. This may seem counterintuitive, but it automatically follows from the way the global balance of payments works. If foreign governments intervene in their currencies and accumulate U.S. dollars, they push down the value of their currency and will run current-account surpluses exactly equal to their net purchases. Purchasing excess amounts of dollars is a policy, in other words, aimed at generating trade surpluses and higher domestic employment. The reverse is true as well: Because its trade partners are accumulating dollars, the United States must run the corresponding current-account deficit, which means that total demand must exceed total production. In this case, it is a tautology that Americans are consuming beyond their means. But being able to take on debt is not a privilege. When foreigners actively buy dollar assets they force down the value of their currency against the dollar. U.S. manufacturers are thus penalized by the overvalued dollar and so must reduce production and fire American workers. The only way to prevent unemployment from rising then is for the United States to increase domestic demand -- and with it domestic employment -- by running up public or private debt. But, of course, an increase in debt is the same as a reduction in savings. If a rise in foreign savings is passed on to the United States by foreign accumulation of dollar assets, in other words, U.S. savings must decline. There is no other possibility. So where is the privilege in all this? Ask any economist to describe the greatest weaknesses in the U.S. economy, and almost certainly the list will include the gaping trade deficit, the low level of savings, and high levels of private and public debt. But it is foreign accumulation of U.S. dollar assets that, at best, permits these three conditions (which, by the way, really are manifestations of the same condition) and, at worst, causes them to deteriorate. Oddly enough, it seems the whole world realizes this state of play -- except the United States. Recently, certain Latin American and Asian central banks began diversifying out of the U.S. dollar and increasing their purchases of Japanese government bonds. But did Japan think itself lucky that it was finally going to be able to share in the exorbitant privilege dominated by the United States? That foreign purchases of bonds would force up the yen, force down the Japanese trade surplus, and allow Japanese consumption to rise relative to production? Japanese authorities failed to see this as a positive. They began intervening heavily, buying U.S. dollar assets as a way of pushing down the value of the yen -- which effectively converted foreign purchases of yen into foreign purchases of dollars. They refused to accept any part of the privilege and insisted on handing it back to the United States. Consuming beyond your means, in other words, is considered a curse for other countries even as they insist that it is a privilege for the United States. They are half-right. It is an economic curse because it forces the reserve-currency country to choose between rising unemployment and rising debt. Must foreigners fund the U.S. government? What about the second exorbitant privilege -- doesn't the huge amount of foreign purchases of U.S. government bonds at least cause interest rates to be lower than they otherwise would have been? After all, any increase in demand for bonds (assuming no change in supply) should cause bond prices to rise and, with it, interest rates to fall. But of course this assumes there is no concomitant rise in supply; and here is where the argument falls apart. Remember that foreign purchases of the dollar force up the value of the dollar, and so undermine U.S. manufacturers. This should cause a rise in unemployment -- and the only way for the United States to attempt to reduce this level of joblessness is to increase its private consumer financing or public borrowing. (Technically, it can also increase business borrowing for investment purposes, but this is unlikely when the manufacturing sector is being undermined by a strong dollar). To maintain full employment, the supply of U.S. dollar bonds must rise with the increased foreign demand for U.S. dollar bonds. Purchases by foreigners of U.S. debt, in other words, are matched by additional debt issued by Americans. But in this case, interest rates will not decline. The domestic supply of bonds rises as fast as foreign demand for bonds. What if you believe, as most economists do, that trade is a more efficient way to create jobs than government spending or consumer financing? Well, then, the amount of additional American debt issued will actually exceed net foreign purchases, in which case increased foreign purchases of U.S. dollar debt may actually cause U.S. interest rates to rise. Confused? There's an easier way of thinking about it. By definition, any increase in net foreign purchases of U.S. dollar assets must be accompanied by an equivalent increase in the U.S. current account deficit. This is a well-known accounting identity found in every macroeconomics textbook. So if foreign central banks increase their currency intervention by buying more dollars, their trade surpluses necessarily rise along with the U.S. trade deficit. But if foreign purchases of dollar assets really result in lower U.S. interest rates, then it should hold that the higher a country's current account deficit, the lower its interest rate should be. Why? Because of the balancing effect: The net amount of foreign purchases of U.S. government bonds and other U.S. dollar assets is exactly equal to the current account deficit. More net foreign purchases is exactly the same as a wider trade deficit (or, more technically, a wider current account deficit). So do bigger trade deficits really mean lower interest rates? Clearly not. The opposite is in fact far more likely to be true. Countries with balanced trade or trade surpluses tend to enjoy lower interest rates on average than countries with large current account deficits -- which are handicapped by slower growth and higher debt. The United States, it turns out, does not need foreign purchases of government bonds to keep interest rates low any more than it needs a large trade deficit to keep interest rates low. Unless the United States were starved for capital, savings and investment would balance just as easily without a trade deficit as with one. Rebalancing the scales The fact that the world has a widely available and very liquid reserve and trade currency is a common good, but like all common goods, it can be gamed. When countries use the dollar's reserve status to gain trade advantage, the United States suffers economically -- without the benefit of exorbitant privilege. What's worse, the greater the subsequent trade imbalances, the more fragile the global financial system will be and the likelier a financial collapse. If the world is to address these global imbalances, it cannot do so without addressing the part that currency intervention and accumulation play. Some 70 years ago, John Maynard Keynes tried to get the world to understand this when he argued in favor of Bancor, a supranational currency to be used in international trade as a unit of account within a multilateral barter clearing system. He failed, of course, and we have been living ever since with the consequences. Perhaps things are improving. On the surface, it looks like the world is starting to understand the reserve currency mess, but still too much muddled thinking dominates. For example, government officials in many countries talk about promoting SDRs as an alternative to the dollar, but much of the reasoning behind it is bureaucratic thinking. The world doesn't hold more SDRs, their argument goes, largely because there isn't a better formal mechanism to create more SDRs. Fix the latter and the former will be resolved. But this is not why the world's central banks don't hold SDRs. If any large central bank, like that of China, Japan, Russia, or Brazil, wanted to buy SDRs, it's not hard for it to do so. All a central banker would need to do is check Wikipedia for the formula that sets the currency components of the SDR and then mimic the formula in its own reserve accumulation. The recipe is no secret. But most of the world's largest holders of U.S. dollars as reserves will never do this, because of trade constraints. By buying SDRs the central banks are implicitly spreading their reserve accumulation away from dollars and into those other currencies. In doing so, any country that tries to generate large trade surpluses by accumulating reserves would be forcing the corresponding deficit not just onto the U.S. economy, but onto other countries (according to the currency's component in the SDR). But Europe, Japan, and others have made it very clear, that they oppose these kinds of trade practices and will not allow their currencies to rise because of foreign accumulation. The world accumulates dollars, in other words, for one very simple reason. Only the U.S. economy and financial system are large enough, open enough, and flexible enough to accommodate large trade deficits. But that badge of honor comes at a real cost to the long-term growth of the domestic economy and its ability to manage debt levels. Without a significant reform in the way countries are permitted to hold U.S. dollar assets, there cannot be a meaningful reform of the global economy. If the SDR is truly to replace the dollar as the dominant reserve currency, it will not happen simply because there is a more robust institutional framework around the existence of the SDR. It will only happen because the world, or more likely the United States, creates rules that prevent countries from accumulating U.S. dollars. Will this happen anytime soon? Probably not. Washington is mysteriously opposed to any reduction in the role of the dollar as the world's reserve currency, and countries like China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, and perhaps even Brazil will never voluntarily give up the trade advantages of hoarding dollars. But at the very least, economists might want to clear a few things up -- and let's start by abolishing the phrase "exorbitant privilege."

18 komentarzy:

  1. Facet odwraca kota ogonem. Amerykanie mając rezerwową walutę świata dostają kredyt o ujemnym oprocentowaniu. Mogą tą kasę zeżreć (wydać na socjal), a mogą kupić zagraniczne aktywa.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  2. @SiP - nie przejmuj się tak tymi tłumaczeniami aż tak bardzo, każdy inteligentny człowiek powinien władać j.angielskim w stopniu, który pozwoli zrozumieć tekst, a mając darmowe słowniki również lekko można się podszkolić w trudniejszych "słówkach".

    pozdr,
    stały czytelnik

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  3. @SinofCane

    Twój pomysł odpada i jest zły.
    Jeśli ją "zeżrą" to własnie będzie tak jak teraz - konsumenci będą zadłużeni po uszy, nie mając nic w ręku

    Z kolei gdyby te same pieniądze inwestowali masowo w zagraniczne aktywa to mieli by wysokie bezrobocie w kraju bo przecież nie było by długu w kraju.

    Musisz się wgryźć w materiały. Przyznam że temat nie jest łatwy:(

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  4. @baqu

    Zdziwił byś się ile osób nie rozumie wpisów na blogu:( Niestety tak jest ale jak mówię, nie mam czasu na tłumaczenia. Ledwo mam czas na bloga.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  5. @SiP
    To ze „zżarli” jest faktem i nie podlega dyskusji.

    Natomiast Twoje drugie zdanie jest z gruntu fałszywe i jakimś paskudnym keynes’izmem mi jedzie. Co ma piernik do wiatraka? Załóż sobie ze USA za te wszystkie $ co świat je w celach rezerwowych kupuje oni sobie surowce kupione za granicą na takiej wielkiej kupie gromadzą. Jaki wpływ miało by to na stopę bezrobocia w USA?

    Trzecie zdanie waszmościa to 100% erystyki w erystyce :) nie będę się wgryzał w wypociny faceta który twierdzi, że 2+2=5.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  6. @SinOfCane

    Powtórzę raz jeszcze - temat nie jest trywialny a wręcz trudny.

    Zakup czegoś za dolary kreuje popyt. Tak ogromny popyt i tak ogromne kwoty (mówimy o bilionach dolarów) spowodowały by gigantyczne ceny surowców. Powiem krótko - dlatego właśnie Chiny i inne państwa nie inwestowały w surowce bo rynek jest za płytki (to tak jak byś chciał zainwestować 1 bln dolarów w złotówkę). Ile dla przykładu wynosi roczna produkcja złota? Jak nie wiesz spójrz na mój ostatni wpis o papierowym złocie.

    Twój wpis w tym aspekcie przypomina mi pomysły jakiegoś teoretyka, lub stratega bez praktyki i bez znania realiów.

    Zapominasz poza tym o kolejnym aspekcie - przechowywanie surowców. Nie da się tak łatwo przechowywać bez po pierwsze ponoszenia gigantycznych kosztów, a po drugie surowce się psują, np metale zwykłe łapie rdza itd.

    Pettis czy ktoś inny kiedyś napisał bardzo ciekawy materiał na ten temat tj obalając mit jakoby np. Chiny miały własnie inwestować masowo w surowce zamiast w dolara. Dla przykładu osoby nie znające się na sprawie bardzo często zapominają że gospodarki wschodzące, bardziej jak rozwinięte potrzebują gigantycznych złóż surowców z uwagi na gigantyczne potrzeby budowlane. Innymi słowy zakupy tych gospodarek wschodzących spowodowałyby ogromnie wysokie, pewnie kilka razy więcej niż teraz, ceny miedzi, niklu, stali itp. To po prostu strzał w kolano.


    Oczywiście inwestycja w surowca jest bez sensu z innego jeszcze punktu widzenia US. Nadal bezrobocie utrzymywało by się wysokie bo to takie inwestycje nie kreują miejsc pracy w dużej ilości.

    Zupełnie bez sensu jest Twoja wypowiedź - tutaj ją zacytuję: "Natomiast Twoje drugie zdanie jest z gruntu fałszywe i jakimś paskudnym keynes’izmem mi jedzie. Co ma piernik do wiatraka?"

    Rzucasz zdanie z sufitu z bez żadnego dowodu a zasłaniasz się nieokreślonym tutaj keynesizmem. Tutaj rozmawiamy o bilansie płatniczym.

    pzdr,
    SiP

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  7. @SiP
    Surowce podałem jako przykład, USA mogło by inwestować w cokolwiek co daje przynajmniej 1% zysku rocznie.

    Gromadzenie surowców nie jest takie wcale głupie jak spojrzysz w jakiej sytuacji jest Japonia w starciu z Chinami jeśli chodzi o pierwiastki ziem rzadkich, rynek surowców jest naprawdę bogaty bo jest ich wiele różnych. Tak jak dziś Chińczyki wykupują taką dajmy na to Australię tak samo mogły zrobić USA parę dekad temu.

    Reasumując:
    Jeżeli cały zysk ze statusu rezerwowej waluty świata USA przeznaczyły by na inwestycje zagraniczne które miały by łącznie 0% stopę zwrotu to by się w USA wydarzyło NIC :P jeżeli chodzi o bezrobocie i inne farmazony jak „zagregowany popyt wewnętrzny”.


    Wiesz SiP idąc Twoim tokiem myślenia to darmowy towar jaki dostaje USA z zagranicy jest dla USA przekleństwem. Jest to prawda pod tym względem, że łatwa kasa rozleniwia tak jak socjal. Idąc dalej tym tokiem rozumowania to czym taniej eksportujemy tym lepiej tak? A jak dopłacamy do każdej wywiezionej tony węgla to już w ogóle jest super? – no bo import wtedy mały i nie niszczy nam miejsc pracy!

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  8. @SinofCane

    "Surowce podałem jako przykład, USA mogło by inwestować w cokolwiek co daje przynajmniej 1% zysku rocznie. "

    Cześć,

    ODP: Jak napisałem, bardzo zły przykład. Skoro przykład jest zły to po co go podawać? Chyba nie przemyślałeś odpowiedzi.

    SoC: "gromadzenie surowców nie jest takie wcale głupie jak spojrzysz w jakiej sytuacji jest Japonia w starciu z Chinami jeśli chodzi o pierwiastki ziem rzadkich, rynek surowców jest naprawdę bogaty bo jest ich wiele różnych. Tak jak dziś Chińczyki wykupują taką dajmy na to Australię tak samo mogły zrobić USA parę dekad temu. "

    SIP ODP: Metali ziem rzadkich wcale nie jest mało (wbrew nazwie). Chiny mają prawie 100% tego rynku bo po prostu nigdzie indziej nie była opłacalna produkcja. Teraz ruszyły kopalnie i projekty w US i w innych częściach świata.

    "Reasumując:
    Jeżeli cały zysk ze statusu rezerwowej waluty świata USA przeznaczyły by na inwestycje zagraniczne które miały by łącznie 0% stopę zwrotu to by się w USA wydarzyło NIC :P jeżeli chodzi o bezrobocie i inne farmazony jak „zagregowany popyt wewnętrzny”."

    SIP ODP: Bardzo upraszczając tak. Zgadzam się. Tylko ja to napisałem już w pierwszym komentarzu pisząc:

    SIP: "Z kolei gdyby te same pieniądze inwestowali masowo w zagraniczne aktywa to mieli by wysokie bezrobocie w kraju bo przecież nie było by długu w kraju."

    Potem zacząłeś niby wytykać mi błędy i pisać o keynesizmie co totalnie było bez sensu. W kolejnych wpisach też to napisałem, przekładając na surowce.

    Tak naprawdę to US miało wybór - albo otworzyć granice i złapać z 50 mln nowych imigrantów, obniżyć standard życia ale produkować, albo żyć na kredyt a w międzyczasie starać się rozwijąć zaawansowane techniki produkcji, usług itd.

    Kolejny raz używasz niemiłych słów a moje wypowiedzi traktujesz jako "farmazony", "wypociny" itd. Przestań mnie obrażać. O ile jeszcze bym jakoś starał się zrozumieć Twoją dumę, w momencie kiedy byś miał rację (chociaż to i tak bez sensu), o tyle przy jej braku wygląda to bardzo kiepsko. Proszę o więcej merytoryczności.


    SoC: "Wiesz SiP idąc Twoim tokiem myślenia to darmowy towar jaki dostaje USA z zagranicy jest dla USA przekleństwem. "

    SIP: Po części tak jest, jeśli gospodarka i osoby ją tworzące nie potrafią wykreować miejsc pracy. Niektóre osoby zajmą się różnymi rzeczami, ale dla reszty nie ma pracy, po prostu nie ma pracy.

    Innym powodem jest to co napisałeś:
    ". Jest to prawda pod tym względem, że łatwa kasa rozleniwia tak jak socjal."


    W sprawie Twojego:
    "Idąc dalej tym tokiem rozumowania to czym taniej eksportujemy tym lepiej tak? A jak dopłacamy do każdej wywiezionej tony węgla to już w ogóle jest super? – no bo import wtedy mały i nie niszczy nam miejsc pracy! "

    ODP:

    Zaczynasz wplatać swój tok rozumowania i swoje poglądy w moje usta. Ja takich rzeczy nie napisałem. Sprawa jest o wiele bardziej skomplikowana niż się może wydawać na pierwszy rzut oka. Sprawa zależy chociażby od gospodarki o której rozmawiamy - czy ma własne surowce, czy nie, jaki jest jest sposób zaawansowania, średni wiek populacji itp. Bardzo bardzo uproszczając to eksport powinien być konkurencyjny co WCALE nie znaczy że tani - może być to drogi zaawansowany sprzęt i tego bym sobie życzył, zamiast np gazu z łupków, który rozleniwia co widać w Rosji.

    hej,
    SiP

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  9. @SiP
    Ustalmy pewne fakty na początek.
    Status waluty rezerwowej = przymusowy kredyt o ujemnej stopie procentowej.

    Jak długo mamy ten status kredytu spłacać nie musimy gdyż praktycznie zawsze są chętni na $ (tak jak w standardzie złota praktycznie nigdy nie przychodzono do banku tylko ludzie płacili certyfikatami mającymi 100% pokrycie w skarbcu).

    Czyli gospodarka dostaje darmowy strumień kasy, podnosi się jakość życia i od Maslowa wiemy, że zmieni się zapotrzebowanie konsumentów. Będą chcieli więcej usług których zaimportować się nie da, w związku z czym gospodarka przekształci się w typowo usługową.

    Nadal nie rozumiem jednego w Twoim rozumowaniu, skąd w nim bezrobocie? Gdybyśmy nagle od Marsjan dostali darmowe źródło energii to by nam wzrosło bezrobocie? Te 50 mln emigrantów to już w ogóle jakaś abstrakcja nie związana jak dla mnie z tematem waluty rezerwowej.

    Nie widzę też przymusu zadłużania się gospodarstw domowych w tym systemie, mogą się zdegenerować od dobrobytu ale tak jest wszędzie.

    Z mojej perspektywy pan Michael Pettis Frédérica Bastiata nie czytał! Przecież słońce daje nam darmowe oświetlenie które niszczy z pewnością więcej miejsc pracy w USA niż te drobne jakie udaje się uzyskać ze statusu waluty rezerwowej!

    Co do mojej dumy i „farmazon” to słyszysz to co chcesz usłyszeć! Napisałem, przecież wyraźnie, że „zagregowany popyt” to farmazona, a nie że Ty piszesz farmazony! To chyba nie w 100% to samo co? Po za tym Ty pisałeś o mnie ostrzej np. „...stratega bez praktyki i bez znania realiów.” „...osoby nie znające się na sprawie...” „...jest bez sensu...” „Zupełnie bez sensu jest Twoja wypowiedź...” „Rzucasz zdanie z sufitu z bez żadnego dowodu ...”
    I TY obrażasz się za farmazony? Nie myślałem, że jesteś taki delikatniutki :P

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  10. @SoC:
    "Status waluty rezerwowej = przymusowy kredyt o ujemnej stopie procentowej."

    ODP: Jakiej ujemnej stopie skoro jeszcze jakiś czas temu 10 latki dawały 10%? O czym Ty piszesz?

    Podeślij proszę przy okazji jakiś link, papier naukowy, raport IB do takiego opracowania gdzie to udowodniono o czym napisałeś.

    Czy zatem sugerujesz, że strefa euro ma również ujemną stopę procentową jak i australia, norwegia? Masz na myśli nominalną, czy realną. Bądź precyzyjny proszę.


    SoC:
    "Jak długo mamy ten status kredytu spłacać nie musimy gdyż praktycznie zawsze są chętni na $ (tak jak w standardzie złota praktycznie nigdy nie przychodzono do banku tylko ludzie płacili certyfikatami mającymi 100% pokrycie w skarbcu)."

    SiP: Zakładam że masz na myśli rolowanie obligacji?

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  11. SoC:
    "Czyli gospodarka dostaje darmowy strumień kasy, podnosi się jakość życia i od Maslowa wiemy, że zmieni się zapotrzebowanie konsumentów. Będą chcieli więcej usług których zaimportować się nie da, w związku z czym gospodarka przekształci się w typowo usługową.

    Nadal nie rozumiem jednego w Twoim rozumowaniu, skąd w nim bezrobocie? Gdybyśmy nagle od Marsjan dostali darmowe źródło energii to by nam wzrosło bezrobocie? Te 50 mln emigrantów to już w ogóle jakaś abstrakcja nie związana jak dla mnie z tematem waluty rezerwowej."

    SiP: Nie ma czegoś takiego jak darmowy strumień pieniędzy. Wszystko coś kosztuje teraz lub później, jeśli nie konkretnie to w przełożeniu na coś innego (np rośnie cena z uwagi na podaz pieniadza, skrajny przypadek hiperinflacja)

    Nie musisz rozumieć mojego toku rozumowania, sprawdź linkowany dokument. Odnoszę wrażenie że go po prostu nie czytałeś,ale może mam złe wrażenie i tyle.

    W przypadku deficytu USA mieliby bezrobocie bez długu bo praca ucieka zagranicę. Siłą rzeczy, nawet Twoim wirtualnym darmowym pieniądzem, gospodarka jeszcze bardziej straci konkurencyjność z uwagi na fakt wpływu podaży pieniądza na kształtowanie się cen. Stąd bańka na rynku nieruchomości chociażby. Zresztą gdyby to był klucz do sukcesu to każde państwo rozdawało by pieniadze....

    W związku z brakiem przemysłu i innych gałęzi gospodarki pojawia się bezrobocie, które własnie zapełniasz gospodarką usługową czyli życiem na kredyt w tym wypadku jak sam wspomniałeś. Gdyby nie było właśnie tego strumienia pieniędzy z zagranicy to NIE byłoby DEFICYTu w BILANSIE PŁATNICZYM i masz bezrobocie(!!!). Przeczytaj to zdanie proszę jeszcze raz, jest ważne.

    Te sprawy trzeba łączyć -bilans płatniczy, bezrobocie, napływ pieniędzy itd. Własnie przez to że usa mają chroniczny deficyt i regulanie płynie pieniadz co rozwija rynki długu to ludzie mają pracę w usługach. Bez bowiem zaawansowanego rynku długu tych usług w gospodarce by nie było. Tak wlasnie było z rynkiem nieruchomosci- tych miejsc pracy nie powinno byc, co piąty był bowiem agentem nieruchomosci. A tak masz wirtualne nadmuchane papierowe bogactwo przez co następowała rozpasana konsumpcja ktora musiala sie skonczyc łzami. tak jest zawsze.

    Gdybysmy mieli darmową energię to wbrew pozorom jest szansa że rośnie nam bezrobocie. Ludzie bowiem nie mają pracy w energetyce. Pytanie czy znaleźli by pracę w innym sektorze gospodarki, bardziej wydajnym. Z czasem możliwe. Otoz teorie twórczego niszczenia czy upadku przedsiebiorstw zakladaja że tak sie stanie. Ale co jesli nie ma pracy dla ludzi? Wbrew pozorom uważam że na swiecie jest za duzo rąk do pracy. Problem sie nasili z czasem gdy swiat zostanie zrobotyzowany. Co będą robić ludzie? Tylko nie napisz mi prosze, pic piwko i nic nie robic a kasa bedzie do nich plynac. Albo że zajmą się bardziej zaawansowanymi rzeczami. Tak nie bedzie niestety. Pamiętaj też że nie wszyscy w narodzie są zdolni. Ktoś rodzi się po prostu kiepski umysłowo i musi sprzątać. Skoro sprząta robot, to co on będzie robić?
    Patrz Japonię gdzie wprowadzono tak głupie miejsca pracy jak pozycja "witacza" ktory klania się w urzędzie w pas, kazdemu gościowi, badz typ ktory ostrzega przed dużą dziurą w ziemi. Wszystko po to by nie było bezrobocia.

    Te 50 mln emigrantów to nie jest abstrakcja nie związana z tematem waluty rezerwowej. Zresztą taką propozycję dał admin forum PiG:
    http://forum.gazeta.pl/forum/w,17007,129172398,129175193,Re_US_musi_zrezygnowac_z_dolara_jako_waluty_reze.html

    Tu chodziło o to by stac sie konkurencyjnym i by nie było deficytu na CA, a przemysl nie uciekal do Chin bo praca byla by tansza w usa.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  12. SoC:"
    Nie widzę też przymusu zadłużania się gospodarstw domowych w tym systemie, mogą się zdegenerować od dobrobytu ale tak jest wszędzie."

    To błąd - to jest nieodzowne. Bez rozwiniętego rynku długu ludzie nie mają pieniądza i nie ma takiej wirtualne jprosperity. Kredyt, dług, pieniadz jest jak smar - gdy go nie ma zaawansowana gospodarka umiera (nie mowmy tu o primytywnych gospodarkach indian z 1700 roku)

    Powiem inaczej - wg mnie masz wiedzę opartą na teorii. Spojrz na realia, praktykę, doświadczenia. Gdzie masz kraj z zaawansowaną gospodarką bez długu który ma deficyt na CA?


    "Przecież słońce daje nam darmowe oświetlenie które niszczy z pewnością więcej miejsc pracy w USA niż te drobne jakie udaje się uzyskać ze statusu waluty rezerwowej!"

    Stosujesz sofizmat rozszerzenia. Równie dobrze mogłeś napisać o powietrzu. Argument nie na miejscu.

    SoC:"I TY obrażasz się za farmazony? Nie myślałem, że jesteś taki delikatniutki :"

    SIP: Delikatny to nie jestem ale nie lubię używać i słyszeć takich słów gdy nie ma powodu.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  13. Ciekawie w sprawie wpisu wypowiedział się Vice_versa na forum PiG:
    http://forum.gazeta.pl/forum/w,17007,129172398,129195620,Imigracja_Deprecjacja_w_USA_szansa_dla_Europy_Wsch.html

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  14. Ciekawy temat, szczerze nigdy nie patrzyłem na to z tej strony.
    Jakbyś mógł SiP kiedyś szerzej opracowac ten temat byłoby super.

    Z drugiej strony zastanawiam się czy nie jest za proste; tak to teraz praktycznie poza militarnym przemysłu nie mają, bezrobotni jak są tak są, a na drugim biegunie są Niemcy którzy swoją bazę przemysłowa utrzymali i cierpią na brak wykwalifikowanej siły roboczej.

    Z patologiami typy armie agentów nieruchomości i faktem że na świecie jest za dużo ludzi i za mało pracy pełna zgoda. My jesteśmy najlepszym tego przykładem. Rozlewają łzy nad zastępami młodych wykształconych ;) a co to za przeproszeniem wykształcenie? Jakieś z dupy kierunki typu marketing i zarządzanie, europeistyki, PR-ary czy HR-ry czyli bezproduktywne przerzucanie papierków przez cwiercinteligentów i nagle zdziwienie że nich ma dla nich pracy? A co oni za przeproszeniem będą robic? Wydawac kolejne zezwolenia, rozporzadzenia i zarządzenia? Szkolenia dla obsługi klienta czy języka korzyści dla "doradców finansowych" ;)

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  15. Bardzo ciekawa dyskusja! Kilka uwag z mojej strony

    1) Generalnie, nie wnikając w poszczególne argumenty wg mnie racja leży bardziej po stronie SinofCane
    2) Uważam tez, ze artykuł Michaela Pettisa zbyt silnie polega na założeniu, ze silny dolar likwiduje miejsca pracy w USA. Moim zdaniem nie da się wytłumaczyć gigantycznego deficytu na CA tylko zaniżoną wartością Yuana do Dollara. W moim przekonaniu to szerszy trend związany z globalizacja gospodarki i przenoszeniem produkcji do Azji i innych Emerg. Countries
    3) SiP pisze - „Nie ma czegoś takiego jak darmowy strumień pieniędzy. Wszystko coś kosztuje teraz lub później, jeśli nie konkretnie to w przełożeniu na coś innego”
    Tu moim zdaniem SoC ma racje, dopóki świat chce aby USD był waluta rezerwowa, dopóty mogą śmiało z tego korzystać i jest to za darmo:)
    4) Sip pisze „W przypadku deficytu USA mieliby bezrobocie bez długu bo praca ucieka zagranicę. Siłą rzeczy, nawet Twoim wirtualnym darmowym pieniądzem, gospodarka jeszcze bardziej straci konkurencyjność z uwagi na fakt wpływu podaży pieniądza na kształtowanie się cen. Stąd bańka na rynku nieruchomości chociażby. Zresztą gdyby to był klucz do sukcesu to każde państwo rozdawało by pieniadze”
    Tutaj się nie zgadzam. Moim zdaniem sugerujesz jakoby Chiny były odpowiedzialne za bankę na rynku nieruchomości. To jest robota FED-u i regulatorów. Po prostu dolarów było zbyt dużo nawet jak na potrzeby światowe, a ze nadażyła się okazja na amerykańskim rynku nieruchomości to tam ta nadpodaż trafiła
    5) Odnośnie wpływu takiej sytuacji makroekonomicznej na bezrobocie: Warto zwrócić uwagę na to co robiły Niemcy i Szwajcaria. One tez miały problem w 2 połowie XX wieku z umacniającymi się walutami, a bezrobocie było niskie. Klucz – kredyty eksportowe. Sami najpierw finansowali inwestycje w biedniejszych krajach, biedniejsze kraje za marki i franki kupowały niemieckie i szwajcarskie maszyny, biznes się kręcił i wszyscy się bogacili, bo kredyty trzeba było spłacać z odsetkami. Cala Afryka, pol Ameryki południowej i wiele innych biednych regionów czeka na ta te oszczędności, które mogą wyciągnąć ich z biedy a przy okazji rozruszać amerykańską gospodarkę. Ale tego chłopaki z Goldmana czy z JP nigdy nie zrozumieją wola się wyżywać na zlocie itd.
    Po prostu stany maja szanse w takim układzie stać się takim olbrzymim KfW:)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KfW).

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  16. USA pakuje całą tą kasę w technologie i uzbrojenie. Armia potrzebna im jest, aby utrzymać status dolara jako waluty rezerwowej i rozliczeniowej, a walka z terroryzmem uzasadnia jej istnienie.
    Taki Rzym XX i XXI wieku - w ten sposób ściągają haracz od poddanych krajów: eksportując papierki i inflację w zamian za towary i surowce.
    Niektórzy nie chcą płacić haraczu (chcą towar za surowce, a nie papierki) i buntują się co prowadzi do interwencji "w celu zapewnienia demokracji". Z frustracji spowodowanej dysproporcją sił rodzi się terroryzm, a US Army uzasadnia swoje istnienie i kółko się zamyka...

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  17. Myślę, że jednak było inne wyjście z tego problemu niż bezrobocie lub zadłużanie. Jeśli by stany zdecydowały się utrzymywać mniej-więcej stałą podaż dolarów pomimo ich zakupu przez inne banki centralne to nie wytworzyły by się żadne nierówności. Ceną (?) za to była by deflacja w stanach, bo mniej dolarów pozostało by w obrocie w kraju.

    OdpowiedzUsuń
  18. @SiP
    Ja ciągle piszę o statusie $ jako waluty rezerwowej świata, obligacje mnie nie interesują! Każdy $ jest obligacją oprocentowaną na 0%, gdyby USA nie miało potrzeb pożyczkowych to nie musiało by wypuszczać oprocentowanych obligacji i zamiast nich w obrocie było by o wiele więcej zwykłych $ z tym, że Benek drukował by pewnie nominały w milionach. Drukowali by 2% ponad wzrost PKB i mieli by średnio rocznie 2% inflacji (ekstremalnie upraszczając). A z tego prosto:
    2% x (masa papierowych dolarów za granicą) = renta ze statusu rezerwowej waluty świata.

    Tą rentę można reinwestować lub przejadać, USA zdecydowało się na przejadanie i to z nadmiarem. To tak jak miałbyś drzewko na którym zamiast liści rosły by $ i zamiast zrywać umiarkowanie przesadzał byś z zachłannością i otrzymywał byś niższy plon (drukują obligacje od których już muszą płacić odsetki-czyli przedobrzyli).

    To tyle na temat renty.

    Co do bezrobocia to teorie, że bardziej trawle przedmioty codziennego użytku i zwiększona wydajność pracy powodują bezrobocie są moim zdaniem chybione od samego początku. Przyczyny bezrobocia są ZUPEŁNIE INNE. Mam tłumaczyć?

    Stwierdzenia typu ujemny bilans, lub dodatni bilans mnie strasznie irytują. Wiesz co oznacza słowo BILANS? Podpowiem, że to z łaciny :) Jak komuś wychodzi „ujemny bilans” to albo zrobił błąd albo liczył nie bilans a cos innego.

    Wiesz ja należę do „sekty JKM’a” czyli ludzi z zespołem Aspergera :) = mam inny tok myślenia niż norma, a w dodatku inne aksjomaty. Einstein swoją teorię względności wydedukował siedząc za biurkiem także Twoje wstawki o teoretyzowaniu i nie znaniu rzeczywistości „rynków finansowych” mnie nie ruszają, co ja o tych „rynkach” myślę to możesz przeczytać u Gwiazdowskiego bo uważam to samo co on :)

    Uważam, się za przedstawiciela austriackiej szkoły ekonomicznej, z mojej perspektywy masz zakodowanych co najmniej kilka aksjomatów od keynes’istów i z tego powodu widzisz w tym co ja piszę herezje. Muszę Cię zmartwić heretykiem jesteś TY! :)

    Pozdrawiam

    OdpowiedzUsuń


Komentując anonimowo - podpisz się. Łatwiej prowadzi się dyskusję.
SiP